Pilgrim Street

The latest photographs of the Pilgrim Street redevelopment are available here Pilgrim Street Redevelopment including the demolition of Commercial Union House, Odeon Cinema and the Bank Of England.



Pilgrim Street was historically Newcastle’s principal medieval route. In Gray’s Chorographia of 1649 it was ‘the longest and fairest street in the town’, thronging with medieval pilgrim’s inns and later coaching inns.
Sadly, little can be seen of such antiquity in Pilgrim Street other than Alderman Fenwick’s House at 98-100 Pilgrim Street. This impressive brick building of the late 1600s, near Swan House roundabout is Newcastle’s most complete historic house. Pilgrim Street’s name is said to derive from pilgrims visiting the chapel of St Mary in Jesmond, where miracles supposedly occurred in medieval times.

Pilgrim Street was called Vicus Peregronium before 1230 and was historically part of the Great North Road. It was thus part of the route between the major medieval pilgrimage centres of Durham and Lindisfarne.

The Pilgrim Gate on the medieval town wall stood at the northern end of the street beyond which the Great North Road became the Northumberland Street of today. The Pilgrim Gate was described as ‘remarkably strong, clumsy and gloomy’ but served an important part in defending Newcastle from Scottish invasion.
Once the border troubles were over its low arch was considered an obstruction to traffic and was said to interfere with the circulation of air in the town. It was demolished in 1802.

A street called Manor Chare joined the eastern side of Pilgrim Street but was obliterated by the Swan House roundabout (the roundabout is now called 55 Degrees North). Manor Chare recalled the nearby King’s Manor. The manor was the name given to the former Austin Friary that became a seat for the King’s Council in the North from the 1530s. Manors railway station and the Manors district also recall the name.


Description courtesy of England's North East.



23rd July 2022



Swan House, Articulated Opposites
1969 by Raymond Arnatt. A bronze abstract sculpture, still located on Swan House roundabout but slightly moved from its original location when Swan House was converted into apartments around 2002. This 5m x 3.5m x 3m sculpture was designed as a memorial to Sir Joseph William Swan, the Newcastle inventor of the incandescent light, and is inspired by the form of the first filament bulbs. T. Dan Smith suggested the memorial to Joseph Swan. The work was unveiled on 16th September 1969 by Joseph's son Sir Kenneth Swan. The sculpture was reformed after damage in the 1990s. Source: Sitelines.





10th July 2022



Pilgrim Street, 140-150, UNISON Northern.





11th June 2022



Derelict Fire Station.



Cale Cross House.
1970's built former office block is having it's dangerous cladding removed and being converted into flats.





28th May 2022



Tyneside Cinema and Northern Goldsmiths.
A rare view of these buildings due to the demolition of nearby properties.



Cuthbert House.
Part of the All Saints Business Centre which wraps around All Saints Church.



Pilgrim St, 10-12 Tyneside Cinema.
The entrance to the cinema is concealed down side elevation, and reached through glazed doors. The small entrance foyer has elaborate fibrous plaster Art Deco mouldings on ceiling, cornices and on pilasters surrounding stairwell. Staircase balustrades in similar style. Similar decoration up to second floor level with the same balustrades continuing to third floor. Triple-shouldered arches over entrances to stairs and stairwell apertures. Rectangular double-level auditorium arranged as stalls and balcony. Stalls in semi-basement entered by stairs from foyer, balcony approached from first floor. Straight balcony front, with acoustic fluted decoration. Balcony extends as `legs' to meet proscenium wall. Proscenium of superimposed mouldings with rounded profiles interrupted at sides by three relief bands decorated with rosettes. Side splays embellished with vertical Art Deco panels of pierced fibrous plaster standing on plinths with bands of scrolling Acanthus containing rosettes, below which are dwarf balconies (these may originally have been designed as giant jardinieres, ie. intended for plants) with metal balustrades designed in the form of interlaced circles. Horizontal banding on walls. Square lighting cove in main ceiling; fibrous plaster panels in subsidiary ceilings at sides. Two columns in rear balcony with dish uplighter sconces ultimately derived from the Grosses Schauspielhaus, Berlin, of 1919 by Hans Poelzig. Back wall of balcony inset with sound absorbent panels. Three fibrous plaster panels in rear of balcony soffit. Cafe on second floor above auditorium with Art Deco pilasters and entrance corridor with sumptuous cornice and ceiling decoration. Second auditorium created in roof space above cafe of no decorative interest. ANALYSIS: The news cinema was a type of cinema particularly popular in the late 1930s, where newsreels, topical interest films and cartoons were shown. They formed an invaluable function in disseminating information in the days before television, and these small halls became a feature of major city centres and principal railway stations. Few survive in any form. This is the finest surviving purpose-built newsreel cinema in Britain, incorporating a rare example of a fine cinema cafe. Grade 2 Listed. Source: Sitelines.








19th May 2022



Pilgrim St, 128-130.
Includes No 1 Mosley Street. Shops and offices, 1899 by Benjamin Simpson. Cast iron frame with ashlar facades in free classical style. Four storeys and attic. Three bays to Mosley Street, four to Pilgrim Street. Chanelled piers and entablature to ground floor; central broad segment-headed doorway to Mosley Street, with the entablature projecting on brackets above; large plain-glass windows with glazing bars to the other bays; diagonally-set corner doorway with stylised giant triple keystone over. Giant Ionic Order and full entablature to first and second floors; central bay to Mosley Street has shallow canted mullion-and-transom window rising through both storeys; other windows in lugged architraves, with triple keystones on first floor. Eaves cornice; a single pedimented dormer framed by pilasters, to each front. Grade 2 Listed. Source: Historic England.





8th May 2022



Derelict Fire Station.
A view of the old fire station taken from Worswick Street.





17th February 2022



Commercial Union House.
1970s office block. For much of the last decade, eight floors of Commercial Union House have been rented by artists’ collective Orbis, taking advantage of a ruling that empty commercial buildings must pay full council tax, but get a significant discount if let to charities. Dubbed ‘meanwhile spaces’ to recognise their often temporary nature, a number of such buildings existed around the Pilgrim Street and New Bridge Street area as the area was steadily acquired by development companies linked to the billionaire Reuben Brothers. As development of the area has got under way with demolition on what is now the Stack site and on the former Bank of England plot, Commercial Union House is also in line for the wrecking ball. Source: Chronicle Live.



Cale Cross House.



Cuthbert House.



Derelict Fire Station.





2nd January 2022



Pilgrim St, 128-130.



Pilgrim St, 112-118 Yorkshire Chambers.
Offices. Circa 1902 by C. E. Oliver for Consett Iron Company. Sandstone ashlar; dark slate roof. Free Baroque style. 4 storeys and attics; 9 bays. Doors in centre and left bays each under an oeil-de-boeuf in segmental pediment. Channelled rusticated ground-floor pilasters. Balustraded balconies to first floor windows with double keystones and alternate pediments; architraves to second-floor windows; all sashes with glazing bars. Rusticated quoins; prominent second-floor cornice; top cornice and balustrade. Mansard roof has 7 square- headed dormers, and high, corniced ashlar chimneys. Grade II Listed. Source: Historic England.



Pilgrim St, 100.
House, later inn and latterly Liberal club. Late C18. English bond brick with ashlar dressings; Welsh slate roof. 4 storeys, 4 bays. Ground floor has narrow tapered pilasters defining bays and supporting cornice; high round-arched carriage entrance at left; door and overlight in second bay under wedge stone lintel. Similar lintels to sashes with glazing bars, all with projecting stone sills. Gutter cornice. Grade II Listed. Source: Historic England.



Pilgrim St, 98 Alderman Fenwick's House.
House, later inn and latterly Liberal Club. Third quarter of C17 with C18 alterations. English garden wall bond brick with moulded brick strings; renewed pantiled roof. Basement and 4 storeys; 6 bays, the outer bays projecting. Double door in third bay under pedimented hood on slender posts. Chamfered rusticated columns support upper floors of projections, that at right containing carriage entrance with wood lintel. Windows have flat brick arches; deep floor strings. Ground floor entablature with pulvinated frieze. Renewed stone-coped parapet. Steeply-pitched front roof has central split giving access to walk behind parapet; (entered from box at rear above staircase). Rear: end bays gabled, with dog- tooth strings. Interior shows open-well stair with wide grip handrail and fat turned balusters through all floors to roof. Full-width first floor panelled room with strapwork stucco ceiling. Wood-mullioned 2-light windows in end gables (now blocked by adjacent buildings); roof trusses spring from third floor level. A rare survival in Newcastle of a merchant's house. The Fenwick family played a prominent role in the commerce and government of the town. Grade I Listed. Source: Historic England.



Pilgrim St, 90-92.



Pilgrim St, 82-88.



Pilgrim St, 54-56 Bewick House.
Former Masonic Temple, now offices, shops and club. Built 1894, to the designs of John Johnson, J.K.W. Lowry. Refurbished and converted c1989. Ashlar and brick with ashlar dressings, lead roofs. Pilgrim Street front, 4 storey. Neo Jacobean style. Large off-centre entrance archway, topped by a broken pediment on brackets. To the left a doorway with a small window beyond, to the right a segment headed doorway with raised keystone, and foundation stone plaque beyond. Above on eitherside, single circular windows topped by winged globes. First floor has 5 Doric pilasters, and a central pair of windows, flanked by single windows all with ashlar surrounds and round headed arches with carved tympanums. Attic floor above has central 2-light, and flanking 2 light windows, with squat panel pilasters supporting an entablature and balustrade with ball finials. The centre has an elaborate carved dormer with shield. To the left a small corner cupola. High Bridge front, has to the right a continuation of the Pilgrim Street front, 4 storey with similar fenestration, articulated with pilasters and topped by an elaborate gabled blind dormer. Beyond to the left the facade is red and white brick with ashlar dressings. The first 2 bays are 4 storey and the remaining 4 are 2 storey. The ground floor has an entrance to the left and 5 shop fronts. Shakespeare Street front, 4 storey, 3 window front in the Italianate style. Ground floor has a round headed doorway to left with rusticated pilasters supporting a segmental pediment, and to the right a shop front with a further pilaster beyond. Above 3 deeply sunk windows in surrounds with pilasters and rusticated bands. Above 3 round headed windows in square headed surrounds, also with rusticated pilasters. Above again 3 round headed arches and pilasters. Topped by a deep cornice. See also 67 High Bridge and 16 Shakespeare Street. Grade II Listed. Source: Historic England.



Pilgrim St, 50-52 Bewick House.



Pilgrim St, 46-48 Bewick House.



Pilgrim St, 34-44.
4 shops and houses, now shops and offices. Circa 1837 for Richard Grainger. Sandstone ashlar; Welsh slate roof with brick chimneys. 5 storeys, 7 bays in all, the outer ones in pavilions. House entrance in deep reveal at left of second shop. Shops renewed but third shop retains original wide defining pilasters. Giant flat paired Tuscan pilasters define pavilions containing first floor windows in aedicules and second-floor windows in architraves, both tripartite in the right pavilion. Central 5 bays have window architraves on these floors, with raised cornices to alternate first-floor windows; second-floor entablature has prominent cornice. Third-floor windows in plain reveals, with pilasters to pavilions. All windows sashes, most with glazing bars, except central blind bay. Eaves cornice. Grade II Listed. Source: Historic England.



Pilgrim St, 22-28.
Shops and houses, now offices. Circa 1837 for Richard Grainger. Sandstone ashlar; low-pitched slate roof. 4 storeys, 10 bays, the central 6 projecting slightly, and curved corner bays at each end. Renewed ground floor. Upper floors have sashes, some with glazing bars, in plain reveals, with aprons on second floor. Second floor band and prominent entablature; top band, cornice and blocking course. Grade II Listed. Source: Historic England.



Pilgrim St, 14-20.
Shops and houses, now offices. Circa 1837 for Richard Grainger. Sandstone ashlar; low-pitched slate roof. 4 storeys, 8 bays, the outer ones projecting with Giant Tuscan Order. 4 shops, that at left c.1900, the others renewed or covered over. End bays have tripartite first-floor windows in architraves under bracketed cornices; and bracketed sill to single sash above. Centre bays have sashes with glazing bars in plain stone reveals; bands at first floor and at second-floor sill. Continuous second-floor entablature; top storey has square windows, cornice and blocking course; and pilasters with palmette finials and consoles in end bays. Grade II Listed. Source: Historic England.



Pilgrim St, 10-12 Tyneside Cinema.



Bridge House (NHS).



Commercial Union House.



Derelict Fire Station.



'Pilgrim Place' development.





4th October 2021



Pilgrim Street, 60-64.



Pilgrim Street, No. 70 and Market Lane Hotel.
House, now public house and shop. Early C18. Painted brick with painted ashlar dressings; coursed squared sandstone left return under brick gable; Welsh slate roof. 3 storeys, 5 bays. Giant pilasters at ends and flanking central bay have string at second floor sill level. Renewed ground floor has public-house entrance to left of centre and house entrance at right end. All windows plain sashes in moulded architraves with wedge stone lintels and projecting stone sills. 2 end brick chimneys. Left return gable shows fragments of lower shaped gable brick coping. Grade II Listed. Source: Sitelines.



Pilgrim Street, 82-88.



Pilgrim St, Central Police, Fire Station and Court.
1931. Has a corner entrance. Built in Portland stone. Has a large main doorway and giant columns along Market Street and Pilgrim Street with mythical beasts. This is the third Police Station on this site since 1840. Designed by Cackett, Burns Dick and Mackellan. Grade II Listed. Source: Sitelines.



Looking North from Mosley Street junction.



Looking South from Mosley Street junction.



Pilgrim Street, 140-150, UNISON Northern and No. 2 Mosley Street.



'Pilgrim Place' development in East Pilgrim Street.





20th October 2018









The Stack.
Shopping and leisure in containers built on the site of The Odeon Cinema.





18th July 2018



Swan House Underpass.





South of the Swan House roundabout.



Swan House.
55 Degrees North, formerly Swan House, sits above a traffic roundabout at the bottom of Pilgrim Street, Newcastle. Swan House was built 1963-1969 and housed the offices of BT. Controversially the Royal Arcade, designed by John Dobson and built in 1832, was demolished to make way for Swan House and the Central Motorway. The design included pedestrian underpasses under the roundabout, and was a different take on the 1960's 'city in the sky' vision. The building was named after local inventor Joseph Swan (1828 -1914); outside the building there is a sculpture called 'Articulated Opposites' by Raymond Arnott (1969) celebrating the electric light bulb which Swan invented. In 2004, after a major refurbishment, Swan House was renamed 55 Degrees North - transforming perceptions of it as a "1960s concrete monstrosity" into "165 executive flats, shops, bars and restaurants in a Continental-style plaza". Source: Co-curate.





Mosley Street junction.



Pilgrim Street, 140-150, UNISON Northern.




Swan House roundabout.





24th February 2018





Mobikes at the junction with Market Street.





Market Street junction.




The Tyneside Cinema.



Blackett Street, Nos. 1 and 3, Northern Goldsmiths.
Includes: Northern Goldsmiths, Nos.2-8 PILGRIM STREET Jewellers shop with offices and workshops above. c1895, altered c1932. Designed by James Cackett, altered by Burns Dick and Mackellor. Ashlar with ashlar dressings and Welsh slate roofs. Corner site. 4 storeys and attics. EXTERIOR: Blackett Street front has 6 window front arranged 2:4. Original shopfronts with later etched plate glass windows. Single rusticated pilaster with to left recessed glass doorway. First floor has deeply set sashes in rusticated and moulded ashlar surrounds, that section to right with a central tripartite window with triple keystone. Above similar window arrangement with pilasters and Venetian window to right. Above again 6 round headed windows with coupled Doric columns, those to left topped with an ornate pediment. Attic has single dormer window above to right with 2 sashes and shallow pediment. Curved corner section curved shop windows. First floor has blind central opening with cantilevered square clock topped with a female figure added c1932 and designed by Alfred Glover. Either side single similar round headed openings with shell hoods. Above canted projecting bay window with 3 sashes and columns. Set back above 3 sashes also with columns. Corner topped with circular cupola with round arched windows and ornate carved decoration, topped with a painted dome. Pilgrim Street front has 6 windows arranged 4:2. Original shopfronts with later etched plate windows, to left single doorway with rusticated surround. This facade very similar to that on Blackett Street. Grade II Listed. Source: Sitelines.



Northern end of Pilgrim Street.





7th January 2018



The now derelict Police Station.



Looking south from the Market Street junction.





26th November 2017





The Stack construction.





29th March 2016



Run down south eastern end of Pilgrim Street.




The now derelict Fire Station.





25th December 2013



Pilgrim Street.





27th May 2012



Pilgrim Street, Nos. 34-44.
4 shops and houses, now shops and offices. Circa 1837 for Richard Grainger. Sandstone ashlar; Welsh slate roof with brick chimneys. 5 storeys, 7 bays in all, the outer ones in pavilions. House entrance in deep reveal at left of second shop. Shops renewed but third shop retains original wide defining pilasters. Giant flat paired Tuscan pilasters define pavilions containing first floor windows in aedicules and second-floor windows in architraves, both tripartite in the right pavilion. Central 5 bays have window architraves on these floors, with raised cornices to alternate first-floor windows; second-floor entablature has prominent cornice. Third-floor windows in plain reveals, with pilasters to pavilions. All windows sashes, most with glazing bars, except central blind bay. Eaves cornice. Grade II Listed. Source: Sitelines.



Junction with Shakespeare Street.



The Market Lane.



Pilgrim Street, No. 98, Alderman Fenwick's House.
Merchant's house, later The Queen's Head Inn and latterly Liberal Club. Now offices. Third quarter of seventeenth century, with eighteenth century alterations. English garden wall bond brick, renewed pantiled roof. Basement and four storeys. Carriage entrance at right. Interior retains open-well stair with wide grip handrail and fat turned balusters. First floor panelled room with strapwork stucco ceiling. The earliest name which might be linked with the house is Thomas Winship, tanner. He died in 1695 and the house passed to his daughter Sarah Fenwick (and her husband Nicholas, merchant). The house is shown in the margin of James Corbridge's 1723 map as the property of an "Alderman Fenwick" - possibly Cuthbert Fenwick, Alderman, but probably Cuthbert's brother and Nicholas and Sarah's nephew, also called Nicholas. He was an Alderman in 1719, 1723 and 1724 and Mayor of Newcastle in 1720. The malting part of the house was occupied by a Christopher Rutter. Charles Turner owned the house in 1781, and converted it into The Queen's Head Inn. This coaching inn was the favourite for important receptions and banquets. In 1811 it was used as an auction room for the Benwell estate. In 1883 The Queen's Head Inn was let to the Newcastle upon Tyne Liberal Club. They occupied the building until 1962. It was empty until 1980 when it was leased by Newcastle City Council to the Tyne and Wear Buildings Preservation Trust, who restored it. The work was completed in 1997, and the building is now used as offices. A rare survival in Newcastle of a merchant's house. The Fenwick family played a prominent role in the commerce and government of the town. One of only three significant early brick buildings in Newcastle (the others being Holy Jesus Hospital and Keelman's Hospital). A programme of archaeological recording, carried out in advance of restoration work, suggests that the house was built some time around 1670. Fenwick altered the building shortly after 1693. There is no other house like this, with closet wings framing the front elevation, in Newcastle, Durham, or other north-east towns. There is a parallel in London - Schomberg House, Pall Mall. Its arrangement of rooms somewhat echoes that of a country house of the period. Quality of internal finishes - richly-moulded panelling, fashionable wallpaper, painted lobby on second floor, fine first floor ceiling and cupola. There were further alterations when the building became an inn, and then a gentleman's club. Grade I Listed. Source: Sitelines.





16th May 2012



Junction with Hood Street.





Pilgrim Street, Nos. 112 to 118.
Offices. Circa 1902 by C. E. Oliver for Consett Iron Company. Sandstone ashlar; dark slate roof. Free Baroque style. 4 storeys and attics; 9 bays. Doors in centre and left bays each under an oeil-de-boeuf in segmental pediment. Channelled rusticated ground-floor pilasters. Balustraded balconies to first floor windows with double keystones and alternate pediments; architraves to second-floor windows; all sashes with glazing bars. Rusticated quoins; prominent second-floor cornice; top cornice and balustrade. Mansard roof has 7 square- headed dormers, and high, corniced ashlar chimneys. Grade II Listed. Source: Sitelines.



West side of Pilgrim Street just north of Swan House.



South of Swan House roundabout.



Mosley Street junction.



UNISON Northern and No. 2 Mosley Street.





27th May 2012



Tyneside Cinema.





16th June 2010



Derelict Bank of England.





28th February 2010



Derelict Odeon Cinema.
The former Odeon Cinema on Pilgrim Street in Newcastle collapsed on the evening of 3rd April 2017, just prior to the completion of its planned demolition; luckily no one was injured. It originally built in 1931 as the Paramount Theatre - as a lavish American style 'super-cinema' with a Wurlitzer organ, orchestra and Tiller Girls (dance troupe). The Paramount opened on the 7th of September, 1931 with Jack Buchanan and Jeanette MacDonald in “Monte Carlo”. Paramount theatres were sold to Odeon in 1939 and the theatre was renamed as Odeon on 22nd April 1940. In 1999 the building was Grade II Listed as "The best surviving Paramount cinema in Britain, with well composed facade and rich interior with Lalique glass fittings". However, in 2001 Odeon Theatres Ltd. decided to build a new multiplex in the Gate complex and a successful application to de-list the cinema was made to increase scope for redevelopment. The cinema closed in 2002 and stood empty for many years. Demolition began in December 2016, but the scaffolded building partially collapsed in April 2017. Source: Co-Curate.





12th September 2008



Swan House.





29th July 2008



Swan House.





22nd June 2008



Alderman Fenwick's House.



The now derelict Fire Station.




Carliol House.



Pilgrim Street, 90-92.







The western side of Pilgrim Street north of Swan House.



Pilgrim Street, Nos. 54 and 56, Moor's Buildings.
Former Masonic Temple, now offices, shops and club. Built 1894, to the designs of John Johnson, J.K.W. Lowry. Refurbished and converted c1989. Ashlar and brick with ashlar dressings, lead roofs. Pilgrim Street front, 4 storey. Neo Jacobean style. Large off-centre entrance archway, topped by a broken pediment on brackets. To the left a doorway with a small window beyond, to the right a segment headed doorway with raised keystone, and foundation stone plaque beyond. Above on eitherside, single circular windows topped by winged globes. First floor has 5 Doric pilasters, and a central pair of windows, flanked by single windows all with ashlar surrounds and round headed arches with carved tympanums. Attic floor above has central 2-light, and flanking 2 light windows, with squat panel pilasters supporting an entablature and balustrade with ball finials. The centre has an elaborate carved dormer with shield. To the left a small corner cupola. High Bridge front, has to the right a continuation of the Pilgrim Street front, 4 storey with similar fenestration, articulated with pilasters and topped by an elaborate gabled blind dormer. Beyond to the left the facade is red and white brick with ashlar dressings. The first 2 bays are 4 storey and the remaining 4 are 2 storey. The ground floor has an entrance to the left and 5 shop fronts. Shakespeare Street front, 4 storey, 3 window front in the Italianate style. Ground floor has a round headed doorway to left with rusticated pilasters supporting a segmental pediment, and to the right a shop front with a further pilaster beyond. Above 3 deeply sunk windows in surrounds with pilasters and rusticated bands. Above 3 round headed windows in square headed surrounds, also with rusticated pilasters. Above again 3 round headed arches and pilasters. Topped by a deep cornice. Grade II Listed. Source: Sitelines.





Pilgrim Street, Nos. 93 to 101.
Row of 3 town houses, now shops. Late C18 with late C19 shopfronts. Red brick and render with slate roofs. Dentilated wooden eaves cornice with single rounded lead rainwater heads at either end. Street front, 4 storey, 7 windows with curved end to right. Ground floor has 2 late C19 wooden shopfronts to left with moulded frames, plate glass windows and scroll bracket fascia boards. To right a passage entrance and beyond a further shop front altered late C20. First floor has continuous cill band. Above 7 sash windows, 4 to left with plain sashes and 3 to right with plain sashes below and glazing bars above. Second floor has 4 plain sashes to left and 3 glazing bar sashes to right. Third floor has 7 similar though slightly smaller sashes. INTERIOR. Nos 93-97 have stick baluster staircase with mahogany handrail to upper floors. Doorways have moulded surrounds and 6-panel doors, sash windows have moulded surrounds and pannelled shutters, most rooms retain moulded plaster cornice and some original fireplaces. Nos 99 and 101 has full height stick baluster staircase with mahogany handrail, curved landings and circular roof-light. First floor has room with Greek key and metope cornice. Most doors have moulded surrounds and 6-panel doors. Most windows have panelled shutters and moulded window surrounds. Some original fireplaces with cast-iron basket grate. Grade II Listed. Source: Sitelines.





19th April 2007



Swan House.





4th July 2006



Swan House.





More Information:
Historical Interest:
Historic public houses/breweries on Pilgrim Street:
See my other photos around Pilgrim Street:

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

the GMBU building which is one of the nicer of Pilgrim Street's buildings is not pictured. Many of the treasured buildings of other cities have cathodic protection to prevent the corrosion of the steel frames causing deterioration of the often listed facades, the GMBU building is to my knowledge the only of Newcastle's many at risk buildings with this in place already.

Newcastle Photos said...

Thanks. I'm not sure where the building is that you mean. I'll add a photo if I find out.

neworder said...

what ever happened to the royal archade?

Newcastle Photos said...

Info here
Royal Arcade, Royal Arcade and here Royal Arcade.

Unknown said...

Hi is there anyway I can out the original street plan and door numbers of Pilgrim street from 1881 ?
I know my ancestors lived at 72 Pilgrim Street on the 18181 census.
Many Thanks

Unknown said...

His is there any way I can find out where number 72 Pilgrim Street stood in 1881?
I found my ancestors living there on the 1881 census.