Photos of Newcastle

Armstrong Park


In 1887 Sir William Armstrong donated a large area of land adjacent to Heaton Park, which become Armstrong Park. In 1883 Sir William Armstrong offered Jesmond Dene, the landscaped grounds to his house, to Newcastle City and this was incorporated with Armstrong Park. Heaton and Armstrong Parks have been known under different names over the years. Heaton Park was changed to Armstrong Park when Lord Armstrong donated the adjacent land and since then Armstrong Park is referred collectively as Heaton Park, Armstrong Park and Jesmond Dene.

Later the Council minutes reverted to dividing the sites properly for clarity. Now Armstrong Park is referred to as its original area of land given by Lord Armstrong and Heaton Park is known separately.

The woodland in Armstrong Park had the advantage of being already mature as the grounds were laid out during the 18th century to enhance Heaton Hall (one of those residential estates, like many round the Cities and townships, that have been planted and adorned for best part of a century.) but in contrast to Jesmond Dene the planting was mostly native.




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Armstrong Park Shoe Tree(s)

The Newcastle shoe tree has been around for a few years now and I guess it must have been the amount of shoes on the original tree that made the local council cut down a few of the most decorated branches leaving it a shadow of it's former self. In the last couple of years people have been adding shoes to the other trees along that particular pathway making it more of a shoe tree alley these days.

A nearby sign about the shoe tree says The shoe tree is an old Sycamore, which reaches nearly 40 metres high. There are lots of different stories about how the shoe tree came about, but it is thought some time ago this fine, but ordinary tree became the shoe tree when young people celebrated the completion of their exams by throwing their shoes high into the branches. This has continued and there are now shoes of all different types, showing the fashion trends of the last 20 years. The shoe tree was made famous by the novel "The Taxi Driver's Daughter" by Julia Darling.

Sometimes the tree has too many shoes and the numbers have to be controlled. This is because they can affect the health of the tree and too many can be unsafe. There is therefore an annual harvest of shoes so we can protect this lovely tree.







Armstrong Park Shoe Tree        Armstrong Park Shoe Tree


Armstrong Park Shoe Tree        Armstrong Park Shoe Tree


Armstrong Park Shoe Tree        Armstrong Park Shoe Tree


Armstrong Park Shoe Tree        Armstrong Park Shoe Tree


Armstrong Park Shoe Tree        Armstrong Park Shoe Tree


        Armstrong Park Shoe Tree


Armstrong Park Shoe Tree


Armstrong Park Shoe Tree        Armstrong Park Shoe Tree        Armstrong Park Shoe Tree


Armstrong Park Shoe Tree        Armstrong Park Shoe Tree



Here is a short video about it on YouTube.





OLD PHOTOS OF ARMSTRONG PARK

select this to view the full sized image at the SINE projectPortrait photo of the Armstrong Park windmill. View from the west. Image from May 1979. ©SINE Project











select this to view the full sized image at the SINE projectPortrait photo looking up a bank to Heaton Windmill. View from the west. Image from May 1979. ©SINE Project











More Information: Heaton and Armstrong Parks

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

BRILLIANT SITE MATE, SEEING IM NEWCASTLE THROUGH AND THROUGH, ALL KNOW I DO LIVE ALL THE WAY DOWN IN HERTFORDSHIRE LOL.. matthedger03@hotmail.com

add me asap on msn , ;-) - MATT

Anonymous said...

I really enjoyed the site, I was born in newcastle but then its been 10 years i moved away to manchester. So please could you put some pictures of high heaton , newton road and benton road i would appreciate it if u could put the whole road in. thankyou very much.

ILuvNUFC said...

Thanks. High Heaton is one of the ares coming soon. I'm busy preparing 3 other posts at the momemnt and I'll start on High Heaton next. In the mean time you can see Benton Road on the Four Lane Ends and there is also the Library in High Heaton.

Anonymous said...

Should get some pictures of the white bridge and if you go to the right side of the the bridge (towards jesmond dene) into the trees there is some great messages inscribed on them great site

ILuvNUFC said...

There are some photos of the white bridge area on my Jesmond Dene page. Where one park starts another finishes is a tricky subject at times I've put the white bridge in Jesmond Dene.

I'll have a look for the messages next time I'm along there. Do you mean on the dirt track that follows the river around opposite the allotments?

Jonty said...

Being a Heaton lad I spent many an hour in the parks & Dene. I live miles away now, but still take my dog through there when up home. I showed friends some of these pictures, they visited Newcastle & said the parks & Dene were beautiful.
Some great pictures there.

ILuvNUFC said...

Thanks.
I spent at least half of my childhood in these parks.

Anonymous said...

Hello,

Not sure how long ago these comments were posted.

I have seen a CD tree in Heaton park in 2013. I'm now trying to photograph it but I cannot find it and people I talk to have not seen it.

Does anybody know about it? I am sure it wasn't far from the shoe tree!

Thanks.