Grainger Street

Grainger street is the central street in what is known as Grainger Town, the historic heart of Newcastle upon Tyne, England.

Based around classical streets built by Richard Grainger, a builder and developer, between 1835 and 1842, some of Newcastle upon Tyne's finest buildings and streets lie within the Grainger Town area of the City centre including Grainger Market, Theatre Royal, Grey Street, Grainger Street and Clayton Street. These buildings are predominately four storeys, with vertical dormers, domes, turrets and spikes.

Richard Grainger was said to 'have found Newcastle of bricks and timber and left it in stone'. Of Grainger Towns 450 buildings, 244 are listed, of which 29 are grade I and 49 are grade II*.

Grainger Town covers approximately 36 hectares and the architecture is dubbed 'Tyneside Classical' architecture. One of the streets of Grainger town, Grey Street was described by Pevsner as 'one of the finest streets in England'. The area also includes a Mediaeval 13th century Dominican Friary, pieces of the historic Town Walls and many fine Victorian buildings.

Almost all of Grainger Town is within Newcastle's Central Conservation Area, one of the first to be designated in England. The majority of the buildings are in private ownership. The area around Grey's Monument and Grey Street is expanding fast with high quality shopping outlets, designer fashions and jewellery. The Central Exchange, with its tiled Edwardian Central Arcade, is located within this area. Inside are shops and the Newcastle Tourist Information Centre for maps and guides to the City.

Text taken from Wikipedia - Grainger Town


Grainger Street


Grainger Street


Grainger Street



Grainger Street



Grainger Street



Grainger Street



Grainger Street



Grainger Street



More information:
Wikipedia - Grainger Town
Wikipedia - Richard Grainger
Timmonet - Grainger
The Grainger Town Project
Grainger Town Newcastle upon Tyne - Case Study
Grainger Town Project: Grainger Town Map

Ouseburn Festival 2007

See my Ouseburn page for information and links.


Ouseburn Festival

Ouseburn Festival

Ouseburn Festival

Ouseburn Festival

Ouseburn Festival

Ouseburn Festival

Ouseburn Festival

Ouseburn Festival

Ouseburn Festival

Ouseburn Festival

Ouseburn Festival

Ouseburn Festival


HMS York

The Ship's motto 'Bon Espoir' means Good Hope and was the motto of Edmund Langley, the First Duke of York 1341-1402, who was the fifth son of Edward III.

York was the last of the Type 42 destroyers to be built, at Swan Hunters, for the Royal Navy. Launched in 1982 and accepted into service in March 1985, she is the twelfth ship in the Royal Navy to bear the name.

HMS York

HMS York

HMS York

HMS York

HMS York

HMS York


The HMS York doing full power trials, traveling at around 30 knots.




More information:

Spital Tongues

Spital Tongues is an area located north west of the city centre of Newcastle upon Tyne

Its unusual name is believed to be derived from 'spital' - a corruption of the word 'hospital' that is quite commonly found in UK place names (for example Spitalfields) - and 'tongues', meaning outlying pieces of land. Edward I gave two such 'tongues' of land to the St Mary Magdalene Hospital - hence 'hospital tongues' and eventually 'Spital Tongues'.



February 2010
















October 2008

Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues





September 2007

Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues





May 2007

Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues





February 2007

Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues


Spital Tongues







A handful of photos of the area submitted by Richard Walker a reader of this site and a resident of Spital Tongues. Thanks Richard


 




 





Old Photos

Muriel Latour, an ex-pat Geordie, now living in Canada kindly sent these photos of her family that lived in the Spital Tongues area.

Muriel says My grandfather(Tot) had a house on Dunn's Terrace with a byres and farm yard with about 12 or so cows directly across on the other side of the road. It was a dairy farm and he used to graze his cows on the moor and bring them for milking (by hand) up Hunters Road! The dairy was called Stephenson Bros Dairy.
The oldest photos taken, I would guess, date from around 1886 - 1888, as my grandfather is in them as a young boy and he was born in 1876.

The other two are of him and his brother Joe, with one of the dairy cows and one of Joe with the horse and trap that was used to deliver the milk.





Joe, Tot's brother with the Stephenson Bros. Dairy cart and horse.
© Muriel Latour











Stephenson Family
© Muriel Latour











Tot and Joe
© Muriel Latour










Uncle Bob, Aunt Margot and my grandfather Tot
© Muriel Latour










All of these photos remain © Muriel Latour and must not be used in any format without consent.




More info:
Spital Tongues History Society