Hanover St - Bonded Warehouse

The Bonded warehouses were built between 1841 and 1844 by Amor Spoor who carried out his wealthy trade until his death and it continued on beyond the centenary of these buildings. The warehouses were finally abandoned during the late 1970s.
The warehouses were named 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50.
Houses 10 to 30 were demolished during the early 1980s and replaced with a terraced garden which gained a certain notoriety with local criminals doing all kinds of shady deals and men who batted for the other team, so to speak, carrying on sordid acts in the area. "The gardens" have recently been renovated to make it more open plan meaning less of the dubious goings on.

Warehouse 50 was severely fire damaged in the early 1990s and its carcass was beyond repair and demolished. Warehouse 40 is the only one left standing, just. There are plans to renovate what's left into offices and apartments but I'm beginning to wonder if that will ever go ahead.


Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse




Edit: On the 24th march 2006 there was another huge fire in the remaining building which caused havoc throughout the city.
News report here Crews monitor fire-hit building and the 5 pictures below were taken around 24 hours after the fire but I could'nt get too close due to the area being cordoned off.

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse


Thanks to anonymous who mailed me the 2 photos of the building on fire.


Hanover St Bonded Warehouse



Second Edit:
Warehouse still burning
Decision due on gutted warehouse



Third edit: Fire-hit warehouse talks continue. Thanks to Lynda for the news about the minumum of a partial demolition planned. Read the link and comments for the full story.



Fourth edit: More pictures of the damage here icNewcastle - Burnt-out shell



Fifth edit: Demolition of the top four floors on the front of the building is due start any day now. More demolition may be needed but they plan to keep the internal walls. I got a bit closer to the warehouse today so here are a few of the pictures that I took.

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse



Sixth edit:Thanks to benjymous for the above video shot with his camera from a office just above the fire. Here is a link to all the videos that he shot of the fire on YouTube.



Seventh edit: icNewcastle - Building's fire will not stop flats plan



Eighth edit: 16 Aug 2006 Some 5 months later and still nothing has been done on the site. In fact when I was around there a few days back I managed to get right up close to the building as all the fences around the back had been knocked down and there was no sign of workers or security at all. I was well aware of the fact that it was unsafe to be around there but kids or tourists may not think the same if there were no fences around it. Shame on whoever. Anyhoo here is a few of the photos that I took a few days back.

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse
Hanover St Bonded Warehouse
Hanover St Bonded Warehouse
Hanover St Bonded Warehouse
Hanover St Bonded Warehouse



Ninth edit: 20th September 2006 The owners of the fire-ravaged Victorian landmark were told yesterday to make the ruins safe within 28 days - or see it bulldozed. The Bonded Warehouse at The Close, opposite the Copthorne Hotel in Newcastle, was gutted by the massive blaze in March, but the fragile shell is still standing - and in danger of collapse. Magistrates at Gosforth in Newcastle ruled yesterday that owners Zirca Ltd had to begin work before winter weather conditions started and further endangered the unstable area. If the firm fails to act on the order within 28 days, Newcastle City Council would be able to knock down the buildings and charge the company for the cost. London-based Zirca's managing director Toby Atkinson said yesterday that the company was determined to save the Grade II listed building and would accept the Dangerous Buildings Order. More Here are a few photos of the development which is now well under way.

Hanover St Bonded Warehouse
Hanover St Bonded Warehouse
Hanover St Bonded Warehouse
Hanover St Bonded Warehouse
Hanover St Bonded Warehouse


A few more recent photos as the project nears an end.
Hanover St Bonded Warehouse
Hanover St Bonded Warehouse
Hanover St Bonded Warehouse
Hanover St Bonded Warehouse
Hanover St Bonded Warehouse


OLD PHOTOS OF THE BONDED WAREHOUSE

select this to view the full sized image at the SINE projectLandscape photo of warehouses in The Close, Newcastle. View from the northeast. Image from August 1973. ©SINE Project







select this to view the full sized image at the SINE projectLandscape photograph showing the warehouses on Close as seen from the Gateshead side of the river with, for whatever reason, a Berwick fishing boat moored by the quay. Image from February 1976. ©SINE Project






select this to view the full sized image at the SINE projectLandscape photo looking down Hanover Street. View from the northeast. Image from August 1973. ©SINE Project







select this to view the full sized image at the SINE projectLandscape photo looking at the Ansett Marina building, with the warehouses of The Close in the background. View from the southeast. Image from July 1980. ©SINE Project




More information SINE Project, Structure Details for Amos Spoor Bonded Warehouses Hanover Street


Walker Park


Walker (Wall-Carr – marshy place by the (Hadrian's’s) wall) is situated on an elevated plateau at about (30 metres) above a broad bent in the river Tyne about 3km east of Newcastle City Centre.

Agricultural until the early nineteenth century, the only feature that provoked comment in early topographical descriptions – for its picturesque qualities – was Walker Dene. Rising from small burns which had their confluence within the site of the present park.

Walker Park was laid out in 1888 on about twenty acres of farmland. Thomas Crawford described it in 1904. " At the entrance (to the park) from Somerset Terrace (off Church Street) is the gardeners residence and on the left is a lake, which is utilised for sailing yachts. Most of the borders are studded with trees, shrubs and flowers; a large proportion of the land is used for games of cricket, football etc. There are two large bowling greens, also two excellent tennis courts" Subsequently, a number of pavilions, statues and a bandstand were added.

It was only during the 1930’s that Walker became submerged in the urban spread of Newcastle. The City Council made continued improvement in domestic facilities but this was at the expense particularly of children’s play possibilities and by 1939 the only significant public open space remaining in Walker was Walker Park.

No new parks were laid out in Newcastle after 1914 and at Walker Park facilities were progressively withdrawn. It was not until the 1960’s that local authority once again undertook investments in recreation on any scale. Walker park along with Walker Parish Churchyard is the only significant mature tree planting in the ward Species include elm, sycamore, lime, willow, poplar and whitebeam, which grows alongside mature shrubbery and hedges with spring and summer bedding.

The current layout of Walker Park was designed and opened in 1988.

Description harvested from Newcastle City Council - Walker Park



January 2010
















2006























More information
Newcastle City Council - Walker Park