Photos of Newcastle

Hadrian's Wall In Newcastle and Wallsend

Hadrian's Wall (Latin: perhaps Vallum Aelium, "the Aelian wall") is a stone and turf fortification built by the Roman Empire across the width of what is now northern England. Begun in AD 122, and largely completed within six years, during the rule of emperor Hadrian to prevent military raids on Roman Britain by the Pictish tribes (ancient inhabitants of Scotland) to the north, to improve economic stability and provide peaceful conditions in Britain, and to mark physically the frontier of the Empire.

A significant portion of the wall still exists, particularly the mid-section, and for much of its length the wall can be followed on foot. It is the most popular tourist attraction in Northern England, where it is often known simply as the Roman Wall. It was made a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987. English Heritage, a government organisation in charge of managing the historic environment of England, describes it as "the most important monument built by the Romans in Britain".

Hadrian's Wall extended west from Segedunum at Wallsend on the River Tyne to the shore of the Solway Firth. The A69 and B6318 roads follow the course of the wall as it starts in Newcastle upon Tyne to Carlisle, then on round the northern coast of Cumbria. The wall is entirely in England and south of the border with Scotland by 15 kilometres (9 mi) in the west and 110 kilometres (68 mi) in the east.

The Roman Wall was originally built to end at Pons Aelius (Newcastle). Work began in Pons Aelius in 122AD and proceeded towards the west. Subsequently, it was decided that the Wall should be extended further east, probably to protect the river crossing at Pons Aelius. In about 127AD, work was begun on a further four-mile section of the Wall east from the fort of Pons Aelius, passing through present-day Byker and ending at the new fort of Segedunum.

This page will concentrate on the remains and reconstructions in Newcastle and Wallsend only. I think I covered it all but if anyone knows where there may be more to see please let me know.


Part 1 - Segedunum at Wallsend

Segedunum ("strong fort") lay at the eastern end of Hadrian's Wall (in Wallsend) near the banks of the River Tyne, forming the eastern-most portion of the wall. It was in use as a garrison for approximately 300 years, almost up to 400AD. Today, Segedunum is the most-excavated fort along Hadrian's Wall.

The site of the fort now contains the excavated remains of the buildings' foundation of the original fort, as well as a reconstructed Roman military bathhouse based on excavated examples at Vindolanda and Chesters forts. A museum contains items of interest that were found when the site was excavated and a large observation tower overlooks the site.

Site map

Segedunum Musuem

Segedunum Musuem and Remains

Segedunum Musuem and Remains

The reconstructed Roman military bathhouse

Inside the reconstructed Roman military bathhouse




Part 2 - Wallsend Remains and Reconstruction

A portion of the original wall is visible across the street from the Segedunum museum, and a reconstruction of what the whole wall might have looked like when new.

Original remains next to a reconstruction

Original remains next to a reconstruction

Original remains next to a reconstruction

The reconstruction

The reconstruction



Part 3 - Reconstruction at Byker

In 2000 archaeologists excavating an area in Byker earmarked for the new East End Swimming Pool and Library rediscovered part of the wall, together with an additional defence system they had never knew existed.

As well as turning up the two-metre wide foundations of the wall itself, the archaeologists found evidence of the Roman equivalent of a barbed wire entanglement.

Hadrians Wall at Byker



Part 4 - Benwell Temple

The remains of a small temple dedicated to the local deity Antenociticus. See the photo of the notice board below for more information.

Benwell Temple

Benwell Temple

Benwell Temple

Benwell Temple

Benwell Temple

Benwell Temple



Part 5 - Benwell Vallum

An original causeway over the vallum, or ditch. See the photo of the notice board below for more information.

Benwell Vallum

Benwell Vallum

Benwell Vallum

Benwell Vallum

Benwell Vallum

Benwell Vallum

Benwell Vallum



Part 6 - Denton Burn Remains

A small stretch of remains of the wall on the SW corner of where Denton Road(A191) crosses the West Road(A186).

Denton Burn Remains

Denton Burn Remains

Denton Burn Remains

Denton Burn Remains



Part 7 - Denton Hall Turret

The foundations of a turret and a 65-metre (213ft) length of Wall.

Denton Hall Turret

Denton Hall Turret

Denton Hall Turret

Denton Hall Turret

Denton Hall Turret

Denton Hall Turret

Denton Hall Turret



Part 8 - West Denton Remains

A small section of the wall 70yds to the west of the Denton Hall Turret(above).

West Denton Remains

West Denton Remains

West Denton Remains

West Denton Remains

West Denton Remains


More Information:



A map featuring the locations of the photographs. Zoom in using the controls in the top left of the map for a closer look of the locations.


View Hadrians Wall in Newcastle and Wallsend in a larger map


8 comments:

George Myers said...

I just saw "Sting" on the television talking about where he used to live now the Roman archaeology site. This is a wonderful site should get some sort of award. I think he was pointing out the fourth photo and mentioned its where he used to live, a tough situation then. Wondering where that hall nearby he was meeting with friends and musicians. Now I get it "Wallsend"! Mum's side an Urquhart, built it to keep us out I guess, or to encourage development, I work in archaeology in the States. Merry Christmas. I was once in place in Nissoquogue, NY full of lutes! Friend of his?

Anonymous said...

There's another tiny stretch of visible wall you've missed out. It's at the top of Shield's Road, by the roundabout, just in front of the house that's standing there - I think it's a pub.

ILuvNUFC said...

George: Thanks for your kind words. Did you say Sting was looking at this site?

Anonymous: Thanks, I'll check it out. I think where you mean is what used to be the Blue Bell pub and now it's a cycle shop.

George Myers said...

No I saw him on US TV around his old neighborhood and it looked alot like this in Wallsend. The Ship pub or something where he was meeting old friends? A white building round at the front like it might have been on a narrow "V" where two streets run into each other.

ILuvNUFC said...

Thanks.
Sounds to me like the pub was the notorious "Ship In The Hole" pub which is situated between Swan Hunters Shipyards and Segedunum.

Google Maps
Ship in the Hole

George Myers said...

Oops sorry to take so long to get back. Yes , that's it, I'm quite sure. A friend used to house-sit for a lute player, former stable I think had a OED condensed version, 2 vols/ read with a magnifier.

ILuvNUFC said...

No bother.
I'm not as old as Sting but I did visit that pub a few times back in the late 80's and it had a bit of a reputation for being rough.

Anonymous said...

HI- MY PA USED THE SHIP IN THE HOLE IN THE 50,S-HE ONCE TOOK MY MA AND SOME OTHER RELATIVES THERE ONE EVENING-MY MA NEVER SPOKE TO HIM FOR AGES AFTER-THE PUB HAD SPITOONS AND ACTUAL SAWDUST-PA SAID YOU COULD BUY ANYTHING THERE AS A LOT OF STUFF CAME OFF THE SHIPS.THERE WAS AGREAT ENGRAVED WINDOW AT THE SIDE -THE ENGRAVING WAS OF AN .EXOTIC SAILING SHIP.THE SHIP WAS ALSO FREQEUNTED BY LADIES OF THE NIGHT?regards BRIAN WALTON